The reason I ask what you will be using it for is to determine which set of features you need. If you're going to be using it for simpler activities, don't go all out for a Black edition with a 60fps, 1080p cam (all HERO3's are 1080p, anyways). The reason the Black Edition is so expensive is because of the crazy quality it has, and if you're using it for a more simple basis I wouldn't worry about the difference. The Silver or even White is perfectly fine for you. The main difference between these two is the white's camera has a 5 megapixels with 3fps burst while the silver is 11 megapixels with a 10 fps burst -- is that worth $100 to you?
Nearly as good as the GoPro Hero 7 Black in features and video quality, but it's just $220 with a waterproof dive housing included. Its electronic image stabilization isn't quite as good as GoPro's HyperSmooth, but it's definitely better than nothing. You also get shooting options like 4K video at 60 fps (with image stabilization at 30 fps), slow-motion video at 1080p at 120 fps or 720p at 240 fps, time-lapse photos and videos, live streaming and raw photo capture. You don't get anything more than the camera, a battery, the housing and charging and external mic cables, but if your main concern is getting good photos and video for less than a GoPro, this is a safe bet. Read more about the Yi 4K Plus.
Sign up for a cloud-based service. All GoPro cameras are set up to transfer photo and video files to your computer or smartphone, but if you’re serious about backing up your content, consider subscribing to a cloud-based backup service. Cloud-based services, such as GoPro Plus, safely keep copies of your media files and allow you to access them from other devices as needed, which can be a lot more convenient than carrying all of your content around with you on your phone.
The GoPro camera was originally designed by current CEO Nick Woodman as a compact means to capture photos and videos of him surfing. While the devices are often still used for this purpose, the company has come a long way in the 15 years since its initial inception, and GoPro cameras are now used by all manner of extreme athletes and adventurers, in addition to more casual users.
The GoPro HERO7 White is the company’s entry-level model, although the term “entry-level” is a little hard to apply to a camera so powerful. The HERO7 White has most of the same features as the other HERO7 models, with one big difference: the camera is limited to HD (1080p) video and doesn’t shoot in 4K. That’s not as big of a deal as it sounds. The resulting video is still excellent, and the price break more than justifies the concession in resolution. The GoPro HERO7 Silver is another good option for anyone looking for a good middle ground between the HERO7 White and HERO7 Black. It records in 4K at 30 fps, and it even has on-board GPS like its more expensive counterpart. If you need a dependable, affordable 4K camera and you don’t mind that the battery isn’t user-replaceable, the HERO7 Silver is your best option.

But it’s not only the lens lending credit to the impressive video GoPros capture. GoPro’s new Hero6 Black captures 4K video at 60 frames per second (fps) and Full HD 1080 at up to 240 fps. This isn’t just impressive for such a small camera — few interchangeable lens models have achieved 4K/60, with the $2,000 Panasonic Lumix GH5 being the first. As for still photography, the Hero6 shoots 12-megapixel images with features such as WDR (wide-dynamic range, GoPro’s lingo for high-dynamic range or HDR) and RAW file capture. And a new image processor — a first for GoPro cameras — helps improve performance and image stabilization. GoPro has managed to put all of this into a camera that’s not much larger than most DSLR batteries.

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